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“Housekeeping?” The door opened slowly onto a warmly-lit room strewn with papers and the disheveled accoutrements of an afternoon’s tea. “Evening, Kath. Last stop of the evening?”– the man smiled broadly and held the door for my grandmother to come in. “That’s right, sir,” grandma replied, walking slowly toward the desk in the corner. “Good day today?” she continued. “Can’t complain, can’t complain.” Grandma gathered the tea pot, cup, saucer, and looked around the room for the biscuit plate. She discovered it on the bed, partially covered by a small sheaf of papers. “Goodness, you have been busy.” “Oh, I do beg your pardon my dear. Allow me.” He rushed forward and snatched up the papers and quickly tossed them in the bin, which was already stuffed full of discarded writings. “Would you like me to empty that for you?” she asked, somewhat uncertainly. “By all means Kath, thank you.” Grandma had purchased Tolkien’s books a year ago during his first visit to the Miramar and set them by her bed, as yet un-read. She felt bad about that. She wanted to maybe discuss them with him, if for no other reason than to tell him how wonderful they were. Everybody seemed to think so, anyway, and so why shouldn’t she? But for whatever reason she just hadn’t found the time to get to them. She gathered the bin up under her arm, and as she did so she couldn't help but glance at the writing on one of the pages. The hand was wide and loose and rich with purpose. Words stood out to her, like “affray”, and “doom” with it’s pronounced, nordic-leaning “d”. And there were others that looked like names: “Aldarion”, and “Dorlas”. What stories had been left unwritten that day, what tales left unfinished or songs left unsung? She reached for the tea tray with her free hand and turned to face him. “Can I get you anything else?” she asked. “I don’t think so Kath, thank you.” “I’ll be back with your bin in a few then,” she replied. Minutes later the bin was returned, emptied and freshened, and left at the foot of the door outside his room.

Room 205 is a bold, expressive font in the neoclassical tradition. It has 274 glyphs, including more than 30 alternate characters and ligatures.

Check out a sample PDF, here.